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Things To Remember About Homeschooling…

I wanted to post this sooner, but let’s be honest, it’s been a weird week. Even though my children haven’t had the disruption of school closures, they have had every other activity and event in their schedules canceled. No therapy, no music lessons, no church, no going anywhere. Monkey is having a hard time with the idea that food isn’t free range. This is a bad habit I’ve been meaning to tackle for a while now. We have enough food, but with store shelves empty, I want it to last more than 2 days! This Mama has been on poop patrol because SOMEONE decided to swallow a dime…..worst treasure hunt ever! Needless to say, we’ve been pretty unmotivated.

DSC_0748I wanted to share a few things with those who find themselves home with their children all day and aren’t sure what to do with them. First, remember, when homeschooling there is a period known as deschooling. This is a time of transition between school and homeschool. Learning at school is entirely different than learning at home. Let’s be honest, how many kids actually respond well when Mom wants them to do work? Most likely, they will fight you. They will whine, complain and turn on the tears. We’ve homeschooled for two years and we still turn on the tears regularly.

More than likely, if your district isn’t supplying work or online classes, then the students will be required to make up this missed time. So don’t feel you need to teach them everything they would do at school. Instead, focus on reviewing what they were learning so they don’t forget. Practice spelling, read, review math facts, watch documentaries, and read more.

But my kids are bored and stir crazy!? IMG_1923Allow them to create and tell stories, build with legos, cook (so much can be learned in the kitchen). Play board games. I cannot stress enough the amount of learning that happens through board games and they don’t even realize they are learning!

 

It’s also important to keep in mind that a typical day at school is FULL of interruptions, transitions, and disciplinary moments. It will not take you 6 hours to do a day’s worth of work at home. Please don’t try… you will burn out your child quickly. Schools typically move at the pace of the slowest child. Teachers have to wait for everyone to get on the same page before continuing. When you only have your children, things go much faster. Remember, most homeschoolers only do a few hours of work a day. We are almost always done before lunch.

IMG_1807Remember to give yourself grace and your children patience. None of you were prepared for this! Today, it’s 3:00 and I am still fighting my kids to finish their math. Yes, it happens to the best of us. What have we done today? Mr. Man spent the morning reading to Monkey. He read him the entire first Press Start book. Then, we took turns working on our new Osmo Detective Agency app. and worked on our Timberdoodle Smart Cookies logic game (I will be posting a review for this shortly). After that, we spent some time working in the garden and playing outback with their new bunny, Oreo. Will we get to the math? Eventually. It just didn’t seem that important today. Remember, it’s important to look at the big picture. Think about what’s important, TODAY. One step at a time….we want to emerge on the other side of this and still enjoy each other.

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Please take a look at our page of things we love for more ideas.

I am joining in with Timberdoodle‘s blog hop, take a look for more great homeschooling activities and tips.

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Disclaimer: This page contains affiliate links. However, I never recommend something we don’t love and use. Happy Homeschooling!

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Turing Tumble: A Timberdoodle Review

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In a generation of computers, coding, and engineering, Turing Tumble appears to be a wonderfully fun and unique hands-on learning experience for our children. I was given the opportunity to review this product and am eager to share what the Beans think.

DSC_0194First, what is Turing Tumble? Simply, it is a hands-on logic puzzle that will help our children learn how computers work using coding, switches, bits, binary counting and a lot of problem-solving. The students read through a comic book style activity manual and complete puzzles as they go, all while manipulating components on a puzzle board. Turing Tumble is available at Timberdoodle and is included as part of their 2019 Sixth-Grade Curriculum Kit. 

So what did the Beans think? I wanted to love this product, I truly did. The product and manual are gorgeous and very inviting. I think it has a ton of potential, but sadly it is not for us, at this time. I am not saying it’s a bad product, or that I wouldn’t recommend it for the right family It just doesn’t work for my family, right now. Let me explain in more detail…

The good… DSC_0165

The product is beautiful and really well made. My husband even commented on how impressed he was by the inserts that are included to keep everything neat and organized. He’s a board gamer so inserts are very important. The book is inviting and eye-catching. I like how the puzzles introduce new pieces and scaffold the student’s learning to move them along from puzzle to puzzle. My 5-year-old is my logical child, while he obviously couldn’t read the comic or follow the logic, we did have great conversations about the patterns that were created while working the puzzles.

Why it didn’t work for us…

dsc_0183.jpgMy children are a little young for the product. We knew this when we began, the recommended age for this product is 8+. Mr. Man is 7. However, with ASD he sometimes takes to activities such as this in a way that surprises us all. Sadly, he showed absolutely no interest whatsoever. This is the way of our life, everything is “go big or go home”. One problem he had while we worked through the puzzles was that it was very difficult for him to manipulate the pieces or place the tiny balls due to fine-motor weaknesses. I myself became frustrated at the balls constantly falling when trying to insert them in the starting position. I feel like this could easily be fixed with a small piece of clear plastic on this part of the computer board. Perhaps with a hole to load the balls into. The plastic would keep the balls from constantly popping out of place and requiring one to reset the whole system. I also realized, after we started, that this is a hard activity for a child who struggles with cause and effect.

While this activity was too advanced for my children, my husband and I enjoyed working through the puzzles, to an extent. This activity does not work well for someone with a low frustration tolerance (or a Mama who is trying to reduce stress for medical reasons)! I also believe that it will work better for children who do not give up easily. Some of the puzzles require a lot of trial and error and a good dose of patience.

DSC_0195Who would it work for…

I think this product would be great for the right family. I definitely recommend it for older children who have an interest in computers, logic, and coding. Logical thinkers who enjoy solving puzzles will love Turing Tumble. This would make a great cooperative small group activity. Again, probably best for a child who isn’t easily frustrated. I definitely plan on keeping this one on our shelf to bring out again in a few years.

 

 

 

 

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